Top Trainers, Plus How To Convert City and Country Form

Most greyhound followers generally know the best trainers state to state, and for good reason. Trainers such as Jason Thompson and Andrea Dailly are renowned for winning.

In Victoria, all the leading trainer info for overall wins and for each track can be found at the following link:

https://fasttrack.grv.org.au/Statistics/LeadingTrainers

It is worth dissecting each track and noting which trainers perform well. For instance, Mark Delbridge was exceptional in early 2017, training plenty of winners at Geelong.

The reverse also applies. There are many trainers you can disregard, or lay, as they have extremely poor strike rates.

Get to know the best trainers at each track and those who appear to be making up the numbers. The only negative is these runners can be huge prices on the exchange to lay but can at least help narrow down the runners in each race you wish to back.


Looking at one trainer a little more closely, Andrea Dailly is without doubt one of the best trainers in the country. She has had some amazing results, especially at The Meadows where she went close to training the entire card twice at the Wednesday meetings in 2017.

Positives

  • Dogs are incredibly strong, no matter the distance of the race you can be sure they will keep hitting the line.
  • Seem to have a knack of winning races in quaddie legs (ie-usually the best prizemoney on the race card).
  • Dogs chase well, very rarely do they fight in races or pull up.
  • Most of the dogs they train come from the Wheeler line (Dyna’s, Bale’s etc) and are broken in/pre trained at the best facilities.

Negatives

  • If have a couple of poor runs can suddenly jump out of the ground next time meaning they can be a little hard to predict.
  • The Dailly’s have their own track so most of the work is done at their property, meaning that greyhounds often race at a track without having seen that track before.
  • They have so many dogs it can be hard to keep up with all of them. Some of their greyhounds can frequently run twice a week so ensure your form guides are updated.

Converting City & Country Form

Generally a greyhound will have a few starts at provincial tracks before running in the city. This is especially the case in NSW with only one Sydney metropolitan track.

In Victoria, maiden races are frequently run at The Meadows on a Wednesday and Sandown Park on a Sunday so a dog can race at a city track very early in his career.

As sprint races at city tracks are run over 500 metres, the best way to decipher country times is by their run home time. Becoming familiar with overall times on country tracks and a dogs run home time is imperative.

Geelong and Warragul are good examples. If a greyhound at these tracks breaks 26.00 seconds it is a good indicator that they will be able to run 500+ metres at a city track. A run home time of 14.50 at Warragul is strong and a good gauge for city tracks.

With maidens being run at The Meadows and Sandown Park my preference is that they have a race start on the track before they become a betting commodity. I apply this rule across the board as I prefer the greyhound to have seen the venue. In Victoria you cannot determine if they have trialled there but with NSW the Public trial information for maidens is available on form guides at thedogs.com.au.

When dogs are having their first run on a city track, if they can run home in better than 10.70 at Sandown Park and 12.20 at The Meadows it is a strong sign they can run the distance as they gain more race experience.


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